Skylochka

3 days ago with 30,514 notes, via andisbetter, from andisbetter
andisbetter:

Ignorance can be bliss—but don’t you just love knowing that there’s amazing power and wicked technology inside every Ford? Let AND Is Better whisk you away to your happy AND spider-free place.

andisbetter:

Ignorance can be bliss—but don’t you just love knowing that there’s amazing power and wicked technology inside every Ford? Let AND Is Better whisk you away to your happy AND spider-free place.



5 days ago with 217,505 notes, via watsonsstripeyjumper, from stunningpicture
stunningpicture:

Milk in cookie cup.

stunningpicture:

Milk in cookie cup.



6 days ago with 20,976 notes, via hobbitry-in-arms, from vmagazine

trendytraveler:

dream home

(Source: vmagazine)



6 days ago with 76,347 notes, via yourlifecoxswain, from lucithor

lucithor:

WHY WAS I UNAWARE OF THE FACT THAT “DISGRUNTLED” IS, IN FACT, THE OPPOSITE OF “GRUNTLED”

image

WHY DOES NOBODY USE THIS WORD



6 days ago with 144,169 notes, via captaincies, from unpagliacciotriste

(Source: unpagliacciotriste)


#art

1 week ago with 43,363 notes, via serazienne, from unicorn-meat-is-too-mainstream

wnycradiolab:

unicorn-meat-is-too-mainstream:

photographer Yume Cyan has been shooting some magical long exposure photographs of fireflies in a forested area around Nagoya City, Japan. By keeping the camera’s shutter open at a low aperture Cyan captures every bioluminescent flash of each insect resulting in dotted light trails that criss-cross the frame.

We never get tired of fireflies.



1 week ago with 256,163 notes, via fairylighted, from itsnotflirting
http://fairylighted.tumblr.com/post/81976913301/redhoods-itsnotflirting-man-more-people-need

redhoods:

itsnotflirting:

man more people need to join the fucking bedroom fandom

image

i mean look at this shit.

image

it’s bunk beds and a little desk.

image

a motherfucking aquarium!

image

shit it’s like noah’s ark in the fucking ceiling

image

look how modern this shit is

image



1 week ago with 188,698 notes, via captinswan, from broughttoyoubytheletterq

broughttoyoubytheletterq:

theleeryone:

broughttoyoubytheletterq:

what do you call a dictionary on drugs

If you say addictionary I swear to fucking god I will cut you

I was gonna say ‘high definition’ but yours is better


#haha

1 week ago with 107,481 notes, via brucebannerisms, from oedipus-sex

oedipus-sex:

imagine your current friend group but dwayne the rock johnson is an unquestioned part of it



2 weeks ago with 367 notes, via allthingslinguistic, from allthingslinguistic
The Great Language Game: Which languages are most confusable?

allthingslinguistic:

You’ve probably played The Great Language Game in the past few months: the one where you listen to short audio clips and try to identify the language being spoken. The creator of the game recently released the results of over 16 million plays of the game as a json file for anyone to analyze, along with a few graphs

Hedvig Skirgård has a guest post at Replicated Typo analyzing these results in more depth by creating clusters showing which languages get confused with each other the most often. 

It would seem, to no-one’s surprise, that there are patterns reflecting that more closely related languages are more easily confused with each other. The biggest split in the data appears to be between ‘Western’ languages and Non-Western languages.  This makes sense if the majority of the players are from the West.

The Slavic languages form a cluster and so do the Germanic and Romance to a certain degree. There are however exceptions, Portuguese is for example closer to the Slavic than Romance (this conforms to one of the authors intuition). Interestingly, Romanian and Portuguese appear to be further from Spanish and Italian than Albanian and Greek.

As for the non-Indo-European languages in the sample it would appear to be much more confusion in general and potentially areal patterns emerging. The worst confusion is between African and Austronesian languages.  Hindi and Nepali are Indo-European languages, but end up closer to their Dravidian geographical neighbours. The most clear example of the geographical associations is perhaps that Mandarin, Cantonese, Korean and Japanese are confounded even though they are very different structurally.

The full post also includes fascinating cluster graphs comparing how languages are confused differently depending on the (automatically-detected) location of the respondent. For example: 

It’s interesting to note that players from the West place Hebrew and Yiddish together with Germanic languages, while players from Asia place Yiddish with German, but Hebrew with Semitic languages.